Skilly Music's Blog

From behind the Mixing Console

How to improve your vocal mixing (Pt. I)

Jul 302018

“What can I do to make my vocals sound good?!” - You’ve probably asked yourself this question many times. If you are a singer or rapper, let me give you some quintessential advice that might help you.

First things first


Every voice is different. Settings that help the voice of the top-selling artist to be at the top of the charts, might do nothing to help your voice. In fact, such settings might even harm it. Keep that in mind as you read pieces of advice regarding frequency numbers, etc.
Your voice is unique. And what is unique, has to be treated as such. That’s why opinions about microphones vary so much. I will say this though – the better the vocal recordings, the easier it is to mix them properly.

Equipment


Let’s say you take a picture of a sunset over Paris with an old, two-megapixel camera. It’s going to be a great picture, nonetheless. But if you try to make a poster out of it, you’ll end up with a blurry, pixelated mess. What the pixels and camera quality are to your eyes, bits and studio equipment are to your ears.
Expensive, high-end studio equipment can indeed give you a sense of what makes it expensive, or to put it correctly, what makes it different. Using it is a good way to train your ears. But never suppose that quality lies in the price, because like I mentioned above, every voice is unique and just because something is expensive doesn’t mean it makes your voice sound better. With that said, if you ever have the chance to record with different studio equipment, different mics, different workstations etc., please do so! It will give you the opportunity to consider the best arrangement for your voice.

Environment


Keep recording sessions dry. You can add every reverb, and every room ambiance you can think of with just a few clicks, but it is almost impossible to remove recorded room ambiance from your signal. So, do everything possible to keep your room dry. If you have a booth, you are probably in a good situation. If you don’t have one, try to build one (it’s easier than you think—just google “vocal booth self-made” to get some inspiration). If you don’t have the time or the money for it (you don’t need a lot), at least try to separate your recording area from the rest of your room in some way. Beware though, dry does not mean dead! Don't overuse the all so trendy absorbers in your vocal booth as they will swallow the life out of your voice. They will kill the high mids and highs which will make your voice sound dull.

Panning and Track Numbers


Everybody has a different approach to panning and the number of vocal tracks that are necessary. I’ll just tell you my opinion.
The lead vocals for verses are usually placed in the center. If you want to give your listener a certain intimacy, it’s always better to use only one vocal track. It just keeps your mix clear and it makes the listening experience better. I’m not a fan of doubling the entire verse. With all the subtle differences between the two takes – including the consonants that never get matched up perfectly – it just makes your vocals sound messy. If you want a clear lead vocal, only use one track.
The next thing I would do is record two tracks in which you double certain parts of the verse. Pan them both in opposite directions (15 to 40), and reduce their volume. You have to hear a difference between the doubled part and the part without doubles, but don’t make it that obvious. Just so that it gives your vocals and the meaning of what is being said in certain parts more power. Doubling is more common in rap music. If you are singing, rather than rapping, be careful when doubling because it can make your vocals too artificial and too pop-ish. On the other hand, if you are going for that pop sound, doubling might be a great tool for you!

In the chorus, you can record two vocal tracks and pan them between 30 to 60 – one to the left, one to the right. Another option would be to record a third track, which is placed in the center, but not as loud as the lead vocals in your verses.
Some people record one lead track and double it (copy and paste it) and edit them differently (EQ, compressor, pitch, etc.) This can be another great tool to make your vocals sound different in certain parts of the song, just like the panning advice I mentioned above. Try it out and see how you like it.

See you in Part II!

 

FAQ - Frequently Asked Questions

Jun 052018

I want to buy music! Do I have to sign up before?

  • No! There is no need to sign up before you can buy beats.

What does a purchase include?

  • Each purchase includes a high-quality 320kbit/s Mp3 version, an uncompressed Wave version file and the contract/invoice-receipt stating your rights of ownership and the terms and conditions. Both audio files will be delivered without the voice-tags, so the music is ready to be used in any project. You will receive these files as electronic download-links, sent to your email address. Please check your spam folder if you do not find our emails in your inbox!

What methods of payment do you accept?

  • We accept Paypal and all major credit cards. You can purchase beats through the PayPal-shopping-cart and instant store on my website skillymusic.com

I purchased a lease and would like to upgrade to a higher license, how much will it cost?

  • The cost to upgrade is the difference from your initial purchase. If you want to upgrade your license please contact me by email info@skillymusic.com

Will the voice tags be removed from the music after the purchase?

  • Yes, all audio marks will be removed from the instrumental with the purchase of any license.

Can I still use music I have leased after exclusive rights have been sold?

  • Yes! As long as you stay within the respective terms, you are allowed to use it. Selling exclusive rights does not affect previous leases.

I’ve bought exclusive rights. May the music be leased again or has it been leased before?

  • Once a piece of music is sold exclusively, the music may no longer be sold/leased. However, it may be possible that a beat has been leased to someone else before. If you thinking about purchasing the exclusive rights and would like to know if the music has been used by anyone else, please feel free to contact me by email info@skillymusic.com

I purchased music from your store. Can I alter it, cut it etc.?

  • Yes, you can shorten or lengthen it and do required changes to the mix in order to get the best possible final result by keeping up with the terms & conditions. However, you are not allowed to remix or sample the music.

Do you use samples in your beats?

  • Sometimes I do use samples in my beats sporadically. If you would like to know if a beat contains samples you can contact me anytime at info@skillymusic.com

 Do you offer custom beats?

  • Yes, I do! If you’re interested in a custom project, feel free to contact me at info@skillymusic.com

Can I read full terms of use before I buy a license?

  • Yes, you can read the full Terms & Conditions before checkout.

Do I need to send you the songs I made on your beats?

  • Even though this is not required for you to do, I always love to listen to the final result, so don’t hesitate to send me the final song to info@skillyusic.com

Can a sold piece of music be removed from the page?

  • On demand, I can take the sold music off the website if the customer has purchased exclusive rights. Leased music stays on the page since a lease is a non-exclusive license.

How do I give proper credit?

  • Credit must always be given to ‘Skilly Music’ in written form. By making a purchase of any kind, the customer declares that he will give credit to the producer where possible (song or video descriptions, cd cover/booklet, youtube video description, file-names, mixtapes, albums, singles, remixes, social network pages such
    as Facebook, music sites such as SoundCloud, reverbnation, etc.). Further, the license holder is requested but not obliged to include Skilly Music’s website (skillymusic.com) in the credits. Proper credit examples are listed below:
    - Beat prod. by Skilly Music
    - Music prod. by Skilly Music
    - Music: Skilly Music (skillymusic.com)
    - Beat: Skilly Music (skillymusic.com)

Any displayed or downloadable files such as mp3s, wave files, etc. must include “prod. by Skilly Music” within the file name.

Do I have to pay you any royalties or additional fees when I release my song(s)?

  • No, all the licenses are royalty-free, meaning you keep 100% of all profits/earnings made.

Can I use a tagged piece of music for free if it’s non-profit use only?

  • If you are planning to record a song to one of my beats and make it available online to the public (even if it's only for free download or stream via YouTube, ReverbNation, Soundcloud, Soundclick, etc), or if you want to use a piece of music for your video or video game, a license MUST be purchased. When purchasing a license, you will receive the untagged, high-quality version of the music with instant delivery to your email!

How long will I have to wait to receive the beats I purchase?

  • All links are sent automatically, as soon as the payment has been settled. Sometimes there might be a delay (up to 10 minutes) due to technical malfunction of some of the services. Be sure to check your spam folder as well. In case you haven’t received your beats, contact me at info@skillymusic.com and I’ll solve the problem as soon as possible.

I see that you are doing soundtracks. Do you also produce custom soundtracks for film projects?

  • Yes, I’ve produced a lot of music for all kinds of genres like drama, comedy, horror, corporate movies, etc. If you need custom made music for your project, feel free to contact me at info@skillymusic.com

Do you also do sound design or sound mixing?

  • Absolutely! I’ve done sound design and sound mixing for movies and trailers and I love doing it!

Do you also do time-based exclusive deals?

The music I want is marked as ‘SOLD’. Is there a chance to buy it anyways?

  • Usually, if a track in the store is marked as ‘SOLD’, it means that it’s not for sale anymore. However, it might be the case that the music is only sold for a time-based exclusive license that ends soon, so if you’re interested in a particular piece of music that’s marked as ‘SOLD’, feel free to email me at info@skillymusic.com

What happens to someone who violates against your terms?

  • If someone does not have a license to use my music in commercial or profitable mediums, I will definitely be taking legal action.

I still have questions.

4 Tips on how to make your base drum sound great

May 282018

1. Use an EQ


Almost every base drum consists of two important frequency bands. The bottom of a classic base drum ranges between 65 and 110 Hz, and the top ranges between 3 and 5 kHz (sometimes 8 kHz). The bottom and the bass are two of the major components that will give your song/beat more punch, but oftentimes they get in the way of each other. To avoid that, apply a low-cut to your base drum, somewhere between 30 and 60 Hz. The bottom is where every base drum should have its heart, so adjustments in this band have to be made with caution.
Many base drums serve no practical purpose between 120 and 350 Hz, so you can lower this band by applying a bell filter. The top can get in the way of other instruments (e.g. toms), so it can be useful to reduce it, but oftentimes the top makes a specific base drum sound unique. Experiment and adjust it to your needs. If you like to add a second or third base drum, that’s ok, just keep in mind that every base drum claims certain frequencies and needs room to develop.

2. Compressing


Add a compressor to reduce unwanted peaks, but don’t try to force your base drum into the mix by compressing it too much. Play around with the attack time of your compressor. Sometimes, longer attack times can improve the base drum’s percussiveness and enhance its positioning within the rhythmic structure.

3. Pitching


Pitching your base drum can help your base drum fit the rest of the drums, and the rest of the song/beat. It can also help to fit your snare drum, and vice versa. Base drum and snare drum are like the yin and yang of your drums. They have to be complementary! Keep in mind that pitching can change the whole “essence” of your base drum, so you might need to EQ afterwards.


4. Reverb


First off, be careful about adding reverb to your base drum. Too much reverb will make your beat sound muddy. In fact, this applies to all instruments of your mix. A nice little reverb on your base drum is a good thing, though. It’s a great tool to make your base drum sound more connected to the rest of your beat and to make it feel more natural. A dry, reverb-less base drum isn’t a bad thing in and of itself, either. For example, hip hop often uses a more detached base drum. It makes the base drum sound punchier. Playing around with reverb on different drum elements can even make the beat groovier. You might want to try adding reverb on the snare, but not on the base drum, or vice versa. Or you can apply different reverbs on different drum elements.

One last thing: Every base drum is different. Consider the numbers as a point of reference, but always let your ears decide. Do what YOU like.

Skilly's First Post

May 282018

 

Call me Skilly, call me Matt. Call me music producer, call me beat maker. Call me sound designer, call me audio engineer. Call me crazy, but I love what I’m doing. And I’ve been doing this for almost 15 years.

Music is my everyday passion and I’m striving to create the sound that helps you stand out from the competition. That beat that makes you a better rapper. That soundtrack that touches your movie’s audience. That trailer music that perfectly accompanies your visuals. That mix and master that makes your song sound great. I always try my best to create the sound that you deserve. With this blog, I'm gonna give you insights into how the beats that I produce are created plus tips and tricks to improve your music production skills. Let's go!

Matt from Skilly Music